I cannot come every day to woo

Thomas Ravenscroft (c1582 - c1633): A wooing song of a yeoman of Kent’s son, partsong a 1-4 voci (da Melismata, 1611, n. 22). Pro Cantione Antiqua.

I have house and land in Kent,
And if you’ll love me, love me now;
Twopence-halfpenny is my rent,
I cannot come every day to woo.
  Twopence-halfpenny is his rent,
  And he cannot come every day to woo.

Ich am my vather’s eldest zonne,
My mother eke doth love me well,
For ich can bravely clout my shoone,
And ich full well can ring a bell.
  For he can bravely clout his shoone,
  And he full well can ring a bell.

My vather he gave me a hog,
My mouther she gave me a zow;
I have a God-vather dwels thereby,
And he on me bestowed a plow.
  He has a God-vather dwells thereby,
  And he on him bestowed a plough.

One time I gave thee a paper of pins,
Another time a tawdry-lace;
And if thou wilt not grant me love,
In truth ich die bevore thy face.
  And if thou wilt not grant his love,
  In truth he’ll die bevore thy vace.

Ich have been twice our Whitson-lord,
Ich have had ladies many vair,
And eke thou hast my heart in hold
And in my mind zeems passing rare.
  And eke thou hast his heart in hold
  And in his mind seems passing rare.

Ich will put on my best white slops
And ich will wear my yellow hose,
And on my head a good grey hat,
And in’t ich stick a lovely rose.
  And on his head a good grey hat,
  And in’t he’ll stick a lovely rose.

Wherefore cease off, make no delay,
And if you’ll love me, love me now;
Or else ich zeek zome oderwhere,
For I cannot come every day to woo.
  Or else he’ll zeek zome oderwhere,
  For he cannot come every day to woo.